All change for the NHVAS next week

The National Heavy Vehicle Accreditation Scheme (NHVAS) comes under the umbrella of the National Heavy Vehicle Regulator (NHVR) next Monday and trucking operators need to take note of changes which may effect them. The NHVR has posted a web page in which all of the main changes are outlined for the operator.

 

The scheme will now operate under one fee structure. Truck drivers operating under mass or maintenance management will need to have the accreditation certificate, proof of induction and an interception report book. The truck itself must display the relevant accreditation label.

 

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Operators in NSW and South Australia will now have to have current inspection certificates to add new vehicles to the scheme. Tasmania will have to begin affixing correct labels and source interception report books for the first time. The documentation required to be carried by drivers included in fatigue management schemes may change for drivers in some states.

 

The NHVR has made provisions for operators during the transition period with a letter being provided for those waiting for accreditation labels to be produced to cover up to a 21 day wait. The NHVR also sent out an email setting out the key provisions for stakeholders.

 

“In recognition of the implications for industry, transitional arrangements will be in place for the first six months,” said the email from NHVR. “The NHVR is advising transport enforcement agencies that their authorised officers should apply discretion where drivers are unable to produce the required NHVAS documentation when they are intercepted. This may include the issuing of a warning as opposed to an infringement.”

 

However the message does come with this warning, “If drivers are issued a warning and disregard it, they are likely to be subject to further enforcement action should they not comply with the HVNL requirements.”

 

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Author: Tim Giles

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