Owner Driver Guide To CoR

Many working in the trucking industry are looking for a comprehensive owner driver guide to CoR (Chain of Responsibility) legislation and the implication for individual operators. The National Heavy Vehicle Regulator has been running a series of seminars to get the message out there about the new rules.

 

Owner Driver Guide To CoR

 

Talking to a room full of small operators in the Truganina facility, Kym Farquharson-Jones, NHVR Senior Advisor – Chain of Responsibility, uses her experience as a Queensland police officer and as roadside enforcement for Transport and Main Roads (TMR) in Queensland to colour her message and explain the situation.

 

There are four areas where an owner-driver needs to be concerned about risks. The first is the truck itself, then the load the truck is carrying, the road the truck is using and the person who is driving it.

 

The Vehicle

 

Risks from the vehicle come from safety standards. By running through a checklist at the start of the journey it is possible to reduce risk around the condition of the vehicle. Does it meet the safety standards and the dimension requirements? Is it within axle and weight regulations? Is the load correctly restrained, and the vehicle and load okay for the route it’s going to take? When it’s out on the road, is it within speed limits?

 

Answer yes to this set of questions and the owner and driver of the truck have done all things possible to reduce risk of committing an offence and being open to CoR action.

 

For anyone who owns a truck there is a level of maintenance and recording of that maintenance which has to be done to meet the rules. The daily check needs to be effective. It has to be a robust enough check to ensure the truck is alright to go on the road. The driver needs to be able to check the things they are able to look at.

 

The rules simply say a person must not drive a truck on a road if it is unsafe.

 

The Mass

 

“Mass, dimension and loading have provisions in the rules which are all the same,” says Kym. “You mustn’t get too caught up in the words, you can replace mass with loading, or loading with dimension.

“It’s a big bunch of text which really says it’s up to the driver to make sure the mass complies with mass requirements. The obligation is still on the driver. The interesting thing is there are no longer ‘reasonable steps’. It just says, without a reasonable excuse. It’s important to stress, the changes in the CoR rules have new penalties, but the penalties for drivers have not been affected.”

 

The Load

 

The Load Restraint Guide is currently being renewed by the National Transport Commission (NTC) and in the meantime it has published a draft guide. It should be handed over to the NHVR to be introduced to the industry and roadside enforcement in the run-up to the new CoR laws coming online in July.

 

The changes to the rules seem to be in line with current thinking, but are not expected to be a major departure from the current guidelines. The language and illustrations are reckoned to be easier to understand and presented clearly for the industry. However, the small-operator community will need to be aware of any changes and ensure its load-securing methods are brought up to speed.

 

Boiling the issue of loading down to its basics, the way the CoR rules will look at it, loading any type of freight poses the same questions. Is the load restraint going to stop any unacceptable movement? The restraint must stop the load becoming dislodged. Any movement of freight must be limited and must not adversely affect the stability of the vehicle.

 

The hauling of shipping containers has caused a certain amount of concern, in terms of vehicle stability, as the truck driver has no control or knowledge of how the container was packed. This is likely to pose some difficult CoR questions.

 

The Driver

 

The driver has to be mentally and physically fit to do the task. Fatigue, drugs and alcohol must not be affecting the driver. For the owner-driver, this applies to the owner themselves, but employing someone puts the onus on the employer to ensure the driver is fit and able.

 

Drivers think of the work diary as being the most important part of fatigue management, making sure the diary is right and compliant is of paramount importance to many in the industry.

 

Owner Driver Guide To CoR

 

“Yes, getting the diary right is important,” says Kym. “The most important component of fatigue is managing fatigue. The legislation defines fatigue as feeling sleepy, tired or exhausted. We all know it’s not limited to this. Once you start to feel like this, it’s actually too late. You need to manage your fatigue, as a driver, much earlier. You need to be aware of when you start to lose energy; it needs to be managed before it gets to the sleepy stage.

 

“The other part of it is in managing compliance. You have to be sure you are managing work records. Yes, you keep a record, but you have to be able to convince your employer, you’ve complied with the conditions of the law.”

 

 

 

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Each Component In The Chain

The National Heavy Vehicle Regulator (NHVR) is trying to get information out about changes to Chain of Responsibility legislation to each component in the chain, including drivers, owner-drivers and small operators subcontracting to the bigger operators.

 

Each Component In The Chain

 

A lot of the talking about the next-generation Chain of Responsibility (CoR) rules, which come into force in July, has been about the high corporate fines and possible jail time for offenders higher up the chain. However, the has been flooded with requests to run information sessions all over the country to get trucking operators up to speed on the new rules.

 

The information session Diesel News went along to was different again, targeted specifically at the small operators, owner-drivers and drivers who are subcontractors to global distribution company CEVA Logistics. The event was requested and organised by CEVA, which enjoys a well-developed relationship with its subbies.

 

Often, these operators are on the front line of the CoR front, making the final delivery of goods to the end-customer at the end of a long and complex chain, often from overseas and after the goods have traveled through a number of hands, all with different attitudes and priorities. This is the chain in the real world.

 

Those that handle the last mile in so many of the various supply chains not only bear the brunt of the issues, but they are also the most difficult to access, for an organisation like the NHVR. Most owner-drivers are not sole subcontractors to a large corporate like CEVA, more often they are at the end of a long chain and several degrees of separation away from the prime contractor.

 

Each Component In The Chain

 

Nevertheless, the CEVA subbies are a good place to start for the NHVR, easily accessed in one large corporate site like ‘CEVA City’, an expanding group of warehouses and loading areas, which has sprung up in the last couple of years in the new Melbourne suburb of Truganina. This suburb is the next stage in Melbourne’s relentless spread to the west, towards Geelong, past Altona, Laverton and Derrimut.

 

For the NHVR, talking to the trucking industry at this level is something a little different. Used to dealing with public servants, politicians and industry associations, now the regulator is having to explain what the new rules might mean to the people who are going to bear the brunt of the enforcement of those rules.

 

 

“For me it’s about getting owner-operators to engage with us,” said Sal Petroccitto, NHVR CEO, at the start of the presentation to drivers. “As an organisation, we are very keen for you to continue to do that. I am aware it might seem a little daunting to chat to a regulator, but I really do encourage you to reach out.

 

“Yes, there are changes, but they are not as concerning or scary as some people are making them out to be. We need to understand what’s coming down the pipeline. This is one part of what we do as an organisation; we are quite diverse covering everything from access issues, to productivity and safety, to enforcement and compliance.”

 

Relationships With Other Parties in the Chain

Relationships With Other Parties in the Chain

The practical impacts of the changes in the chain of responsibility rules, due to commence next year, are all about the relationships with other parties in the chain. It’s all about talking to them and working out how to make the activity safer.

 

Relationships With Other Parties in the Chain

 

Simple things like onboard mass monitoring can make sure the truck is not overloaded and can start the conversation. GPS tracking enables you to keep an eye on things. Toolbox talks help get the message out. Operators need to be looking to see if there is a safer way to do a job. Operators can work with other parties in the chain to see if their procedures are helpful.

 

The National Heavy Vehicle Regulator now runs enforcement in South Australia and has three CoR investigators in the state. They are carrying out investigations using the principles set out in the new rules. They are proactively looking a parties in the chain in the state.

 

“Investigators are going to ports, the councils, all suppliers parties in the supply chain to say, ‘how are doing business?’,” says Kym Farquharson-Jones, NHVR Senior Advisor, Chain of Responsibility. “What they are already doing is looking at primary duties. We will work together with people where we can.

 

“When I was issuing speeding tickets and I stopped a car, I could hear the abuse before I got out of the police car. They were saying, ‘I pay your wages, why don’t you go out and catch the real criminals?’ Do you think they were going to get a ticket?

 

“Working together where appropriate is about the attitude test. If you want us to come and help, to work collaboratively with you, we can do that. If you want to call me nasty names it’s going to be a different road.

 

“We are actually going to come in and have a look at how people manage mass, fatigue and maintenance. We will test that, asking for work diary pages for a particular driver, or weigh-bridge dockets for a particular combination. We will review systems and make recommendations. The focus will be on business practices.”

 

Proactive responsibility

 

Kym runs through a practical example of how a scenario may play out after July next year. If there are long queues at the port, with many trucks waiting hours to load. The average number of trucks in the queue at any one time could be 20. Drivers can’t rest because they have to move forward with the queue.

 

Relationships With Other Parties in the Chain

 

“What’s the risk in this?” says Kym. “Fatigue of the drivers is the issue here. Drivers are going to get ratty, not perform well and get tired. The approach here is to work with the operators, asking them how they are managing it. Talking to schedulers and loading managers to try and get this solved as quickly as possible.

 

“Proactive management means, don’t wait for something to happen. Have a look at what you are doing now and making it the safest it can be. Make sure your vehicles work well and your people are trained, qualified and know what they are doing.”

It’s No Longer About The Driver

It’s No Longer About The Driver

As of next year, when looking at chain of responsibility (CoR), it’s no longer about the driver. CoR has been realigned to look at the business practices of the parties in the chain. If a driver is sitting at a distribution centre (DC) for four hours and there is a loading problem, the investigation will look at the loading practices of the DC.

 

It’s No Longer About The Driver
Kym Farquharson-Jones, NHVR Senior Advisor, Chain of Responsibility.

The obligation is about each party in the chain, they have to ensure the safety of their transport activities. The onus is on everyone.

 

“Think of it like this,” says Kym Farquharson-Jones, NHVR Senior Advisor, Chain of Responsibility. “You are cruising along listening to your favourite music, and think about them at a concert. They are the main act, everyone else is a support to them, the roadies, the venue. It’s the same with you owner driver and small operators, the vehicle and the activity its it’s involved in is the main act. Everyone else in the chain has to support the safety of that activity.

 

“This means they have to remove the risk. The risk is the National Heavy Vehicle Law (HVNL) breaches. They have to eliminate the chances of a mass breach, a fatigue breach. As much as they can influence, they have to try and eliminate that from happening. If they can’t, then they have to minimise it as much as possible.

 

“Look at a loading manager situation, if they aren’t doing what they are supposed to be doing, there’s the breach. They also have to make sure what they are doing doesn’t cause or encourage drivers to offend against the HVNL, speed rules or workplace health and safety (WHS) rules.

 

“It’s all about managing that relationship. If people are doing things, which are causing you concern, which aren’t safe, you need to say something. They’ve got an obligation, front and centre. They can’t ask a driver to do something, which will cause them to break the law.”

 

Offences

 

By aligning the new rules with WHS, this means the size of the penalties are much higher than they are currently set. If an operator or another party is reckless in making sure the activity is safe they can suffer a period of imprisonment, for the first time.

 

There are five aspects to the consideration parties must look at. They must look at the chances of something happening. If it does happen, what are the consequences and what can the party do to stop it happening.

 

“If someone falls asleep behind the wheel of a truck, what are the likely consequences,” says Kym. “It is in a high risk category. So what do you know about it and what can you do? When we talk about fitness for duty, we are talking about making sure someone is fit to drive the truck.

 

“I have been to so many operators who tell me the drivers do a ‘tick and flick’ before they start, which is handed in with the paper work at the end of the day. Does anyone look at them? Does anyone gauge whether they fatigued? Does anyone ask them how they are during the journey, or at the end of the day?

 

“This isn’t hard, we could do more things than we are currently doing to manage the fatigue. I’m not saying that’s the right way to do it, let’s just think about what else we can do.”

See It, Mention It and Record It

See It, Mention It and Record It

Next year, small fleets will have to ‘see it, mention it and record it’ if they want to avoid being the scapegoat in Chain of Responsibility (CoR) cases. They need to be prepared and well informed. Diesel News finds out what they need to know, in our Owner Driver’s Guide to CoR.

 

See It, Mention It and Record It
Kym Farquharson-Jones, NHVR Senior Advisor – Chain of Responsibility.

When the new CoR rules come into force in July 2018, it marks a step-change in the way the regulators will look at who is responsible, if and when something goes wrong while a road transport task is taking place. The idea is, the onus will be on everyone involved in the supply chain to do the right thing and ensure the safe passage of goods from A to B.

We have previously covered the basics – the driver and risk areas. We examined what a small fleet operator or owner driver needs to think about and how they need to change their practices to avoid getting caught in the CoR net. The large corporations, who own most of the work small operators are ultimately sub-contracting for, have expensive lawyers and large compliance departments whose only job is to cover their backside.

The smaller operator can’t afford a compliance team, but can employ some smart and careful thinking to do the same job on their behalf. It is not intrinsically difficult, but it is vital to get it right. If you are seen to be in a compromising situation and haven’t done anything about it, you could be liable. More importantly, the real culprit who may have cornered the small operator into doing the wrong thing will not get away with it.

The new rules for 2018 see a change of emphasis in the way the CoR rules work and will be applied. The thinking behind the changes was to bring these rules into line with. and utilise the same philosophy as the workplace health and safety (WHS) regulations.

Running Through a Scenario

The kind of issue we are talking about was outlined by Kym Farquharson-Jones, NHVR Senior Advisor – Chain of Responsibility. She draws down on her years as a police officer and an enforcement officer for the Department of Transport and Main Roads (TMR) in Queensland to paint a picture of an issue and what the consequences can be.

A truck pulls into a stevedore’s yard and a sealed container is loaded onto a vehicle and the driver is handed a container weight declaration. The vehicle then goes to exit the port precinct and on the weigh-bridge, the vehicle’s gross combination mass (GCM) exceeds the legal maximum.

“Who’s accountable in that situation?” asks Kym, talking to roomful of small operators and owner-drivers. “The driver, he’s number one, isn’t he? He’s accountable. The next person is the one who put the load on, the loader is accountable. The loading manager should have known as well. The packer, the consignor all of those people. The owner of the vehicle may not even be there and they are liable. All of these people, under our current rules could get the same infringement as this driver.

“How is it going to be different next year? There’s no more of this situation where the driver commits an offence and everyone’s in. What it will be is everyone who is a party in the chain has to make sure the action of the transport activity is safe. You have to make sure you are not going to breach mass, fatigue, load restraint, because these practices will be under scrutiny.

“‘So far as is reasonably practicable’ is the new definition. The onus will be on the prosecution, not on the defendant as it is now. They will have to prove you didn’t do everything you should have done. They are adding in vehicle standards. This means the maintenance of the vehicles, their roadworthiness will be under scrutiny by other parties in the chain. They have an obligation to ensure standards.”

This does not mean the shipper will want to crawl around under the truck, but if they see something which is not right, they will have an obligation to report it to the operator and ask them what they are going to do about it.

“I did an investigation, where a husband and wife were both executive officers of the company,” recalls Kym. “I asked her what she did in the company and she admitted she brought in sandwiches and tea to board meetings. In that situation, it is not good enough – anyone in that position has to know what the business is about.”

Changes to Chain of Responsibility

Changes to Chain of Responsibility

The National Heavy Vehicle Regulator (NHVR) is trying to get information out about next year’s changes to chain of responsibility legislation to each component in the chain, including drivers, owner-drivers and small operators subcontracting to the bigger operators. In the first of a two-part guide, Diesel went along to a session to find out more.

 

Changes to Chain of Responsibility
Kym Farquharson-Jones, Senior Advisor – Chain of Responsibility, National Heavy Vehicle Regulator.

Talking to a room full of small operators at a freight facility, Kym Farquharson-Jones, NHVR Senior Advisor – Chain of Responsibility, uses her experience as a Queensland police officer and as roadside enforcement for Transport and Main Roads (TMR) in Queensland to colour her message and explain the situation.

 

The driver has to be mentally and physically fit to do the task. Fatigue, drugs and alcohol must not be affecting the driver. For the owner-driver, this applies to the owner themselves, but employing someone puts the onus on the employer to ensure the driver is fit and able.

 

Drivers think of the work diary as being the most important part of fatigue management, making sure the diary is right and compliant is of paramount importance to many in the industry.

 

“Yes, getting the diary right is important,” says Kym. “The most important component of fatigue is managing fatigue. The legislation defines fatigue as feeling sleepy, tired or exhausted. We all know it’s not limited to this. Once you start to feel like this, it’s actually too late. You need to manage your fatigue, as a driver, much earlier. You need to be aware of when you start to lose energy; it needs to be managed before it gets to the sleepy stage.

 

“The other part of it is in managing compliance. You have to be sure you are managing work records. Yes, you keep a record, but you have to be able to convince your employer, you’ve complied with the conditions of the law.”

 

“Even though the legislation is changing next year, for you as a driver the requirement is to do everything in your power to comply with the law,” says Kym. “Your second obligation is, if another person is affecting you complying with the law, you need to see it, write it down and record it. Say something to someone about it, because they’ve got an obligation as well. Those people who are affecting how you run your business, if it’s not safe, then they have an obligation to make sure they change their business practices.

 

“Chain of Responsibility is about managing all of your relationships. Whoever you are dealing with every day, affecting loading and unloading, those are the relationships you need to manage. If the person loading the truck isn’t doing the right thing, they need to be told. You need to have those conversations.”

 

From the owner-driver’s point of view, it is important to make those people, who are most influential in what they are doing, accountable. If someone is influencing the situation to the point where the driver has to break the law in order to do what is required, they are accountable.

Getting It Right

Getting It Right

In the lead-up to the introduction of new Chain of Responsibility (CoR) obligations in July next year, the trucking industry needs to be sure it is getting it right. Diesel News runs through the basics, which operators need to be sure of going into operation on a daily basis.

Talking to a room full of small operators at a freight facility, Kym Farquharson-Jones, Senior Advisor – Chain of Responsibility, National Heavy Vehicle Regulator (NHVR), uses her experience as a Queensland police officer and as roadside enforcement for Transport and Main Roads (TMR) in Queensland to colour her message and explain the situation.

Getting It Right

There are four areas where an owner-driver needs to be concerned about risks. The first is the truck itself, then the load the truck is carrying, the road the truck is using and the person who is driving it.

 

Risks from the vehicle come from safety standards. By running through a checklist at the start of the journey it is possible to reduce risk around the condition of the vehicle. Does it meet the safety standards and the dimension requirements? Is it within axle and weight regulations? Is the load correctly restrained, and the vehicle and load okay for the route it’s going to take? When it’s out on the road, is it within speed limits?

 

Answer yes to this set of questions and the owner and driver of the truck have done all things possible to reduce risk of committing an offence and being open to CoR action.

 

For anyone who owns a truck there is a level of maintenance and recording of that maintenance which has to be done to meet the rules. The daily check needs to be effective. It has to be a robust enough check to ensure the truck is alright to go on the road. The driver needs to be able to check the things they are able to look at.

 

The rules simply say a person must not drive a truck on a road if it is unsafe.

 

“Mass, dimension and loading have provisions in the rules which are all the same,” says Kym. “You mustn’t get too caught up in the words, you can replace mass with loading, or loading with dimension.

 

“It’s a big bunch of text which really says it’s up to the driver to make sure the mass complies with mass requirements. The obligation is still on the driver. The interesting thing is there are no longer ‘reasonable steps’. It just says, without a reasonable excuse. It’s important to stress, the changes in the CoR rules have new penalties, but the penalties for drivers have not been affected.”

 

The National Transport Commission (NTC) is currently renewing the Load Restraint Guide and, in the meantime, it has published a draft guide. The consultation process has now ended and the new guide looks set to be passed by transport ministers in their next meeting in November. After that, it should be handed over to the NHVR to be introduced to the industry and roadside enforcement in the run-up to the new CoR laws coming online next July.

 

The changes to the rules seem to be in line with current thinking, but are not expected to be a major departure from the current guidelines. The language and illustrations are reckoned to be easier to understand and presented clearly for the industry. However, the small operator community will need to be aware of any changes and ensure its load-securing methods are brought up to speed.

 

Boiling the issue of loading down to its basics, the way the CoR rules will look at it, loading any type of freight poses the same questions. Is the load restraint going to stop any unacceptable movement? The restraint must stop the load becoming dislodged. Any movement of freight must be limited and must not adversely affect the stability of the vehicle.

 

The hauling of shipping containers has caused a certain amount of concern, in terms of vehicle stability, as the truck driver has no control or knowledge of how the container was packed. This is likely to pose some difficult CoR questions.

Passing the Buck

Passing the Buck

In the past, the chain of responsibility (CoR) has been seen as a way for big operators to pass the buck. Now, the National Heavy Vehicle Regulator (NHVR) is trying to get information out about next year’s changes to CoR legislation to each component in the chain, including drivers, owner-drivers and small operators subcontracting to the bigger operators. In the first of a two-part guide, Diesel News went along to a session to find out more.

Passing the Buck
A National Heavy Vehicle Operator session looking at chain of responsibility changes.

A lot of the talking about the next-generation CoR rules, which come into force in July 2018, has been about the high corporate fines and possible jail time for offenders higher up the chain. However, the NHVR has been flooded with requests to run information sessions all over the country to get trucking operators up to speed on the new rules.
The information session Diesel News went along to was different again, targeted specifically at the small operators, owner-drivers and drivers who are subcontractors to global distribution company CEVA Logistics. The event was requested and organised by CEVA, which enjoys a well-developed relationship with its subbies.
Often, these operators are on the front line of the CoR front, making the final delivery of goods to end-customers at the end of a long and complex chain, often from overseas and after the goods have travelled through a number of hands, all with different attitudes and priorities. This is the chain in the real world.
Those that handle the last mile in so many of the various supply chains not only bear the brunt of the issues, but they are also the most difficult to access, for an organisation like the NHVR. Most owner-drivers are not sole subcontractors to a large corporate like CEVA, more often they are at the end of a long chain and several degrees of separation away from the prime contractor.
Nevertheless, the CEVA subbies are a good place to start for the NHVR, easily accessed in one large corporate site like ‘CEVA City’, an expanding group of warehouses and loading areas that has sprung up in the last couple of years in the new Melbourne suburb of Truganina. This suburb is the next stage in Melbourne’s relentless spread to the west, towards Geelong, past Altona, Laverton and Derrimut.
For the NHVR, talking to the trucking industry at this level is something a little different. Used to dealing with public servants, politicians and industry associations, now the regulator is having to explain what the new rules might mean to the people who are going to bear the brunt of the enforcement of those rules.
“For me it’s about getting owner-operators to engage with us,” said Sal Petroccitto, NHVR CEO, at the start of the presentation to drivers. “As an organisation, we are very keen for you to continue to do that. I am aware it might seem a little daunting to chat to a regulator, but I really do encourage you to reach out.
“Yes, there are changes, but they are not as concerning or scary as some people are making them out to be. We need to understand what’s coming down the pipeline. This is one part of what we do as an organisation; we are quite diverse covering everything from access issues, to productivity and safety, to enforcement and compliance.
“As an organisation, as we begin to mature, we are starting to get more status across the country. In South Australia, from 3 October, there will be NHVR inspectors actually pulling people over. That will continue across the country. We are having discussions in Tasmania and New South Wales. Over the next three, four, five years you will start to see a consistent national approach to enforcement.”

ESC, PBS, Linfox, Truck Classes and Roller Brake Testing

ESC, PBS, Linfox, Truck Classes and Roller Brake Testing

Among the topics in the news this week from Diesel News are ESC, PBS, Linfox, Truck Classes and Roller Brake Testing.

ESC, PBS, Linfox, Truck Classes and Roller Brake Testing

The Australian Government should require new trucks and trailers to be fitted with stability control technology and should do it fast, according to the Australian Trucking Association (ATA) and the Australian Livestock and Rural Transporters Association (ALRTA).

 

Geoff Crouch, ATA Chair, said electronic stability control is a vehicle safety system that monitors the stability and sideways acceleration of a heavy vehicle, and kicks in to brake the vehicle if it detects a rollover starting.

 

“It’s a vital safety technology and should be mandatory for new trucks and trailers,” said Crouch.

 

The President of the Livestock and Rural Transporters Association of South Australia, David Smith, said that mandatory stability control was in the best interests of the trucking industry, including rural operators.

 

“For us, adverse conditions are an everyday occurrence. Our gear cops an absolute pounding from rutted roads, stones and sticks along with the dust that gets into absolutely everything,” said Smith. “While running costs are always higher in these environments, there are still net benefits for operators who install the latest generation of stability control systems.

 

PBS Assessment

 

A evaluation of the Performance Based Standards(PBS) scheme is being carried out by the National Transport Commission (NTC). It is expected to look at ways to improve the effectiveness and efficiency of the PBS scheme, and in doing so respond to Australia’s growing freight task.

 

Findings outlined in Assessing the effectiveness of the PBS Scheme show PBS vehicles:

  • were involved in 46 per cent fewer major crashes;
  • had a reduction of 440 million kilometres in truck travel and saved at least four lives in 2014-2016;
  • delivered 24.8 per cent productivity gains across all commodities;
  • delivered a 6.2 per cent gross tonne-kilometre saving for 2016;
  • saved about $65 million in road maintenance expenses; and
  • saved 94 million litres of fuel in 2016 and reduced CO2 emissions by 250,000 tonnes.

 

“Road freight is projected to increase by 26 per cent in the next 10 years. PBS vehicles are well placed to assist industry and government in coping with this forecasted growth,” said Paul Retter, NTC CEO. “Since 2007 when the world-first scheme started, PBS vehicles have been involved in fewer crashes, carried more freight with fewer trips, generated lower emissions and reduced road maintenance expenditure. We need to continue improving the scheme to promote greater uptake of these vehicles.”

 

Linfox and Pacific National

ESC, PBS, Linfox, Truck Classes and Roller Brake Testing

Linfox has entered into a consortium with Pacific National to purchase the containerised freight haulage and end-to-end freight forwarding capability on Queensland’s northern freight line. Forming a consortium with Pacific National is the first step towards purchasing these assets that are currently owned by Aurizon Queensland Intermodal.

 

Pacific National will be working with the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission (ACCC) to gain clearance for the acquisition of other assets of Aurizon Queensland Intermodal. Linfox has said it will support this process.

 

If the Pacific National transaction is cleared by the ACCC, Linfox will acquire and use the rail haulage capacity supplied by Pacific National to supply intra-state and interstate freight forwarding services to customers in Queensland and Northern Queensland.

 

Truck Classes Chart

ESC, PBS, Linfox, Truck Classes and Roller Brake Testing

The National Heavy Vehicle Regulator (NHVR) has released a Classes of Heavy Vehicle chart to assist operators to match common heavy vehicles with the three categories used under the law.

 

“While the NHVR and operators use common terms such as B-doubles, low loaders or mobile cranes for Restricted Access Vehicles, they are classified into classes under the HVNL,” said Roger Garcia. “For example, pick and carry cranes commonly fall under the Class 1 heavy vehicle category, and this can be easily determined from our new easy-to-read chart.”

 

The new chart illustrates other common examples from the three different classes of heavy vehicles, such as oversize, over-mass vehicles, special purpose vehicles, agricultural vehicles and vehicles under the Performance Based Standards (PBS) scheme.

 

Roller Brake Testing

 

Trials of roller brake testing methods were conducted at Marulan Heavy Vehicle Testing Station ahead of next month’s end of transition arrangements in New South Wales. Coordinated by the Australian Trucking Association (ATA), the joint initiative involved Heavy Vehicle Industry Australia (HVIA), New South Wales Roads and Maritime Services (RMS) and the National Heavy Vehicle Regulator (NHVR).

 

The testing will allow further comparison of different roller brake testing methods and will inform the development of national requirements to align with the increased brake performance standard set in the National Heavy Vehicle Inspection Manual (NHVIM).

 

The latest version of the manual reflects a correction to the brake performance standard in line with Heavy Vehicle National Law (HVNL) achieved through ATA and industry representation.

 

New CoR Forums

 

The second phase of the NHVR’s Chain of Responsibility (CoR) education program will kick off in October with 26 forums across Australia. NHVR Chain of Responsibility Manager Michael Crellin said the forums would build on the awareness sessions for industry conducted earlier this year.

 

“This is a four-phase process to support the changes to CoR coming in mid 2018,” said Crellin. “We had great engagement during the first phase. We’ve worked our way through the feedback and are currently developing materials to provide practical help for industry.

 

“The materials will provide users with information to identify risks relevant to their operations and install systems that meet the requirements of the law and improve safety.”