Completely Replaced its Truck Line-up

In less than 18 months, Scania has completely replaced its truck line-up

In less than 18 months, Scania has completely replaced its truck line-up – from top-weight prime movers down to low-entry urban warriors, stopping off in between with an all-new construction range. Diesel News’ European Correspondent reckons the Swedish truck maker’s recent range renewal isn’t just about multiple new cabs atop a host of revised chassis.

Completely Replaced its Truck Line-up

It’s introduced a shedload of new engines and drivetrain improvements too. Frankly, it’s been hard to keep up with all the changes but – for the record – the whole shooting match has cost Scania a cool €2 billion ($3.1 billion).

From the start, there was always more to Scania’s New Generation than just new cabs. When G-Series was launched, Södertälje also announced a new 650hp V8 with only selective catalytic reduction (SCR), which plugged a noticeable gap in its 16-litre line-up, along with an innovative 370hp rating to its 13-litre in-line six family.

What marks the 370 out as special is its ‘Miller’ cam-shaft, which uses a special profile that ensures the intake valves are held open a little longer than normal during the compression phase. The upshot is that less air is pumped through the engine, while keeping the exhaust temperatures up so the SCR-only emissions system runs at peak efficiency.

Completely Replaced its Truck Line-up

The 370 also offers a four per cent fuel saving over more powerful 13-litre ratings. Now add to that a revised line-up of more efficient nine-litre ‘DC09’ engines, primary for L and P-Series chassis—as well as an all-new range of seven-litre ‘DC07’ diesels, and it’s clear that Scania’s powertrain engineers have been busy bunnies too.

The DC07 represents an interesting departure for the Swedish truck maker in more ways than one. In addition to being the smallest displacement diesel it’s offered for many moons, the 6.7-litre six-pot, with ratings from 220hp to 280hp, is actually based on the B-Series from Cummins, with whom Scania has a long history of joint cooperation on diesel-engine technology, but with the Swede’s own engine management and emission-control systems. Compared with DC09, DC07 is 360kg lighter and offers fuel savings of up to 10 per cent. Once again, P and (eventually) L-Series chassis are the candidates for fitment.

For me, the DC07 begs an obvious (and a typical journo) question. Namely, at a time when other European manufacturers are increasingly talking about ‘downsized’ engines in their top-weight trucks, why didn’t Scania develop an 11-litre engine instead, and fill the space between its DC09 and DC13 diesels? Given the growing popularity of 11-litre engines for 44-tonne work in the UK, in terms of sales potential alone, I’d have thought an 11-litre lump would offer more than a seven-litre ‘little un’. That said, the DC07 takes Scania into a market sector it’s previously not been in – namely, light distribution.

Completely Replaced its Truck Line-up

Whatever its strategy on diesel displacement, Scania will continue to build the majority of its own truck and bus engines for many decades to come. How do I know that? Because late last year it announced a further €1.5 million ($2.3 million) investment plan for a new, ultra-modern engine foundry that will be powered by electricity generated from renewable energy sources. The DIY decision followed a comprehensive analysis of various alternatives, including increased purchasing from external suppliers. So, more good news for all Diesel News readers who are fans of Swedish integrated drivetrains, and especially those in trucks with a Scania badge on the front.