Lack of Confidence in Safety

Lack of Confidence in Safety

A survey of fleet managers in Australia has, worryingly, revealed a serious lack of confidence in safety of drivers behind the wheel. The national survey was commissioned by Mix Telematics, who supply fleet and mobile asset management telematics tools across the country.

 

Lack of Confidence in Safety

 

The survey went out to 200 fleet managers across Australia in November 2017 and found 26 per cent stating they did not have confidence that their drivers were safe behind the wheel. 33 per cent identified fatigue as the biggest challenge to driver safety.

 

Over half of those surveyed placed a high priority on reducing crashes among their drivers. 37 per cent responded that they were not concerned with saving money, but gave driver safety a higher priority at 46 per cent and 31 per cent said creating a culture of driver safety was their top compliance priority.

 

“Truck drivers are working harder than ever under financial pressures with many pushing themselves to the limits to meet tight deadlines and increasing workloads, with catastrophic outcomes,”says Lara Churton-Hughes, Head of Sales and Marketing for Australasia at MiX Telematics. “We’ve already seen an 86 per cent increase in truck related deaths in NSW which sends a strong message to fleet managers to ensure they have policies and procedures in place to manage this issue.

 

“The research indicates more needs to be done to protect drivers and other road users from the growing threat that fatigue poses. Advances in telematics technology solutions now make it possible to identify and monitor drivers who are tired and distracted and has been proven to significantly reduce fatigue related incidents by approximately90 per cent and improve the efficiency of a fleet.”

 

Lack of Confidence in Safety

 

The survey found 46 per cent of respondents said their fleet used telematics as part of the solution to improve safety outcomes for drivers.

 

These figures do bring up some worrying issues. 49 per cent of respondents, presumably, did not place a high importance in reducing crashes. It may have some importance to them, but not as much as other issues.

 

The identification of developing a culture of driver safety does get a guernsey in this survey and should be adopted across the board if improved safety figures are to be achieved in the Australian fleet.