What’s Under the Hood?

what’s under the hood?

The difference in the new Fuso Shogun is not about what it looks like, it’s all about what’s under the hood? The answer to the question is a whole range of global Daimler components and a demonstration of how the global truck manufacturer spreads its technology across as many brands as possible while trying to keep individual brand identity.

Taking the truck out onto the Hume Highway for a quick drive from Albury up to Tarcutta and back gives Diesel News a chance to see just how this integration works and what the new Fuso Shogun, due out later this year, will perform like when it arrives.

The first part of the under the hood answer is a 10.7 litre Daimler Group engine, based on the same basic platform as the Detroit DD11 in Freightliner trucks and the OM 470 in the Mercedes Benz ranges. 

 

what’s under the hood?

 

What’s Under the Hood?

This engine on the evaluation truck tested here, is calibrated to meet the Japanese post new long-term exhaust emission regulations, which are equivalent, if not tougher than, Euro-6 and will be included in the ADR 80/04 emission rules which were due to come into force around now, but, due to continuing federal government delays, look like making it into force after 2025. When these Fuso models actually make it onto the Australian truck market, the engines will be calibrated to Euro-6 specification.

The engine puts out 460hp (343 kW) of power and has a torque rating of 2200Nm (1623 ft lb). The gearbox is the 12 speed AMT which is also ubiquitous across the heavy truck range from Daimler, known as the Powershift in the Mercedes Benz range and the Detroit DT12 in Freightliner sold in the US, arriving with the Cascadia when it arrives here.

In terms of engine performance, as tested, with this test truck on the Hume Highway pulling a single loaded trailer, the truck handled the climb up over Aeroplane with relative ease holding momentum well. It was able to hold 10th gear at 1700rpm, maintaining its speed with relative ease.

 

what’s under the hood?

 

The suspension on the test truck is, in fact, mechanical. This is not because the new trucks will be arriving in large number with this configuration, but because this is a heavily preferred option in Japan. This truck is, essentially, the Japanese domestic specification being evaluated here in advance of the final specification for Australia being nailed down. 

As what’s under the hood is a completely Daimler driveline the truck will go into Eco-roll as and when it decides that speed can be maintained without input from the engine. The clutch is disengaged and the truck can continue traveling around 100km an hour until it decides to intervene by engaging the clutch again. The reason can be either the need to use more engine power to maintain cruising speed or to use the engine brake to bring speed back down.

This illustrates one of the other advantages of this integrated Daimler group driveline, the availability of a genuine engine brake using decompression to retard the truck.

Despite all of this new technology being included in the design, the truck does retain the essential running gear from its predecessor, using Fuso axles and drum brakes, as opposed to the discs which are preferred by the truck’s European and North American cousins. It also runs on the original Fuso suspension which has proven robust in Australia over the years.

Including more traditional options like drum brakes allows for Fuso to differentiate itself from other members of the Daimler range and appeal to a different part of the market demographic. A customer who prefers drum brakes on their truck can find an option in Fuso, where it doesn’t exist in a Mercedes-Benz.

 

 

what’s under the hood?